Art forms of nature

Delicate antique diamond necklace in silver & platinum, circa 1910

In the years from 1899 to 1904, five booklets were published under the title Art Forms of Nature, in which the German zoologist Ernst Haeckel made his research on the form of animals available to a wider public. Haeckel's approach of depicting the natural beauty of often hitherto unknown creatures, which had come into being without human intervention, led to widespread enthusiasm for the microstructures of nature that could be seen for the first time in these publications. Haeckel presented and arranged the organisms treated on numerous display boards from an aesthetic point of view, whereby his interest was directed towards the structural forms of the living beings visible under the microscope, which often appeared to him like the artistic work of engineers or architects. Haeckel himself recommended his work to the artists of his time as a model: "The modern fine arts and the modern powerfully flourishing arts and crafts, will find in these true "Art Forms of Nature" a rich abundance of new and beautiful motifs." (Leipzig 1904 edition, p. 4) The large-format, colorful lithographic plates on the structure of various living creatures - especially of marine microorganisms - influenced not only science but also the creation of art at the beginning of the 20th century. Haeckel's work stimulated the arts and crafts of those years to such an extent that his art forms of nature became veritable forms of nature in art and were reflected in architecture, reliefs on silverware or precious goldsmith's work. Famous examples of Haeckel's direct influence are the glass chandeliers of the Oceanic Museum in Monaco by Constant Roux and the monumental gateway to the 1900 World's Fair in Paris by René Binet. The design of the necklace here is clearly influenced by this glimpse into a previously unknown world. A filigree openwork pendant is firmly mounted on a delicate chain. The pendulum-shaped pendant ends in a round decorative element in the centre of which a star of fine diamond roses glitters. Five old-cut diamonds set additional highlights. Dissolved in delicate lattice bars, the piece of jewellery radiates a crystalline lightness reminiscent of the tiny creatures depicted in Heckel's work. This piece of jewellery, made around 1910, is very well preserved and came to us from the Palatinate.

In the years from 1899 to 1904, five booklets were published under the title Art Forms of Nature, in which the German zoologist Ernst Haeckel made his research on the form of animals available to a wider public. Haeckel's approach of depicting the natural beauty of often hitherto unknown creatures, which had come into being without human intervention, led to widespread enthusiasm for the microstructures of nature that could be seen for the first time in these publications. Haeckel presented and arranged the organisms treated on numerous display boards from an aesthetic point of view, whereby his interest was directed towards the structural forms of living things visible under the microscope, which often appeared to him like the artistic work of engineers or architects. Haeckel himself recommended his work in the preface to the artists of his time as a model work: "The modern fine arts and the modern powerfully flourishing arts and crafts, will find in these true "Art Forms of Nature" a rich abundance of new and beautiful motifs." (Leipzig 1904 edition, p. 4) The large-format, colorful lithographic plates on the structure of various living creatures - especially marine radiolarians - influenced not only science, but also the creation of art at the beginning of the 20th century. Haeckel's work stimulated the arts and crafts of those years to such an extent that his art forms of nature became veritable forms of nature in art and were reflected in architecture, reliefs on silverware or precious goldsmith's work. Famous examples of Haeckel's direct influence are the glass chandeliers of the Oceanic Museum in Monaco by Constant Roux and the monumental gateway to the 1900 World's Fair in Paris by René Binet.

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We want you to be 100% satisfied! That’s why we examine, describe and photograph all our jewellery with the utmost care.

If for any reason you are still not satisfied, contact us and we will find a mutual solution immediately. Regardless, you can return any item within 30 days and we will refund you the full purchase price.

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